• On the Methods of Preserving and Dissecting Icthyo Sapiens

    by  • November 4, 2013 • Fiction • 0 Comments

    An essay by Dr. Stephen Mackle, as provided by Carrie Cuinn
    Art by Shannon Legler


    Lab Notes, April 23, 1931. The subject has four limbs, but while its skin appears crocodilian, the limbs are not fixed under the body. Instead they appear to be jointed much as a man’s are, with longer back legs and a wide range of motion in the shorter front legs.

    Water is everywhere. It is, always, since the earliest memories of my life. I feel it as a warm pressure on every part of my skin. It is an ever-moving source of air for my lungs and food for my belly. When the currents are strong it becomes thick enough to sit on, to grab a hold of and ride. The water is never still because it is never empty. I can taste the time of day.

    Though it has a mouth and front facing eyes, it does not appear to breathe air, and instead has several gills hidden under heavy scales on its neck which are easy to miss. Kudos to Johnson for noticing them, or the thing might have drowned before we got its head and neck into a bucket of water.

    I was born there, where the river flows into the deep lake. I have traveled upriver to mate, have seen water muddied by great hippos and in places a river lowered by heat and summer sun. I have crawled along the nearly empty river bed, me, who was born in a place so deep no light can penetrate it! I have seen all manner of fish and monsters and men. Everything has a place in the world, everything fits into each other and makes sense, except the men.

    On the Methods of Preserving and Dissecting Icthyo Sapiens

    I bring her eggs back with me when I return to my lake. She is perfect in her beauty, with strong limbs and bright eyes and her children will be safe with me.

     


    To read the rest of this story, check out the Mad Scientist Journal: Autumn 2013 collection.


    Dr. Stephen Mackle holds a Doctor of Science degree in Aquatic Biology from Cleveland College, and a Doctor of Agronomy degree from the Yerevan Veterinary Zootechnical Institute. He briefly taught at Huron Street Hospital College before leaving to pursue other research opportunities. He considers the study of Icthyo Sapiens and other aquatic cryptids to be his life’s work.


    Carrie Cuinn is an author, editor, bibliophile, modernist, and geek. In her spare time she reads, draws, makes things, takes other things apart, and sometimes publishes books. You can find her on Twitter @CarrieCuinn. Links to her published work, as well as her writing blog, can be found at www.carriecuinn.com


    For more information about Shannon Legler, vist her site at http://lendmeyourbones.tumblr.com.


    This story originally appeared in the anthology Monster Gallery.

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