• Posts Tagged ‘Strange Science’

    Strange Science: World-Wide Waves

    by  • January 4, 2019 • Strange Science • 0 Comments

    Map of Mayotte

    Seismic activity in one location often has effects on other locations, as certain seismic waves travel over great distances. What’s more unusual is when this sort of seismic wave travels the world without a precipitating seismic event. On November 11, 2018, seismic waves originating off the coast of Mayotte, a tiny island between Mozambique...

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    Strange Science: Lava Floors

    by  • December 21, 2018 • Strange Science • 0 Comments

    Lava from a 1954 eruption. Not the floor.

    Sometimes, our Strange Science goes a little weirder than other weeks. This week is one of those. We started out by asking ourselves how “the floor is lava” became a thing. The first answer we found was related to a 1948 Roald Dahl story, in which the floor was actually red hot coals and...

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    Strange Science: Solar Power in the Form of a Liquid

    by  • December 14, 2018 • Strange Science • 0 Comments

    Molecules

    Long-term storage for solar energy may be a thing of the past, based on new developments coming out of Sweden. Swedish scientists have improved a molecule consisting of carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen, which rearranges its atomic bonds and becomes an isomer when it absorbs sunlight. Unlike conventional solar panels, which aren’t capable of storing...

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    Strange Science: Schroedinger’s Bacterium?

    by  • December 7, 2018 • Strange Science • 0 Comments

    E. coli bacteria

    In a discovery that seems like it might have come from the pages of fiction, scientists have discovered possible evidence of quantum-entangled bacteria. Or have they? The experiment involved bacteria placed between mirrors and bombarded with photons. But some of the photons simultaneously hit and missed the bacteria. Ultimately, “some of the light interacted...

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    Strange Science: Radium Water

    by  • November 30, 2018 • Strange Science • 0 Comments

    Radithor bottle

    In the early twentieth century, before the days of energy drinks, people turned to an unusual source to give themselves more energy–radium water. Marie and Pierre Curie had discovered the radioactive element known as radium in 1898. It had its earliest applications as a part of self-luminous paints for watches, nuclear panels, aircraft switches, clocks,...

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    Strange Science: Ripening Fruit

    by  • November 16, 2018 • Strange Science • 0 Comments

    Bananas

    Many fruits have a literal sweet spot–that point when they’re just the right amount of ripe to taste their most delicious. Eat them before then, or after then, and you might be disappointed. Ethylene is the naturally occurring chemical that causes fruit to ripen, and it can be accelerated by damaging the fruit or...

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    Strange Science: Suppression of Fear

    by  • November 9, 2018 • Strange Science • 0 Comments

    Diagram of a human brain

    Scientists at Texas A&M University have recently identified a portion of the brain in rats that inhibits fear, which may ultimately lead to new ways to treat conditions like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The nucleus reuniens, a small brain region in the thalamus, was previously believed to primarily function as a pathway for the transmission...

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